Historic Places in South Jersey

Historic Places in South Jersey - Places to Go and Things to Do

A discussion of things to do and paces to go, with the purpose of sharing, and encouraging exploration of South Jersey.

Sunday, March 17, 2013

Cowboy New Jersey, Slim's Ranch Mystery

Well, I thought I had seen the last snow of this winter at Goshen Pond a couple of weeks ago, but yesterday, walking at the Timber Creek Dog Park, the snow fell again, however it only lasted in the air and never covered the ground.  So far, I have been unable to find any history on Slim's Ranch, which is what stood on this property before it became Timber Creek Park, though I found a web site with lovely photographs of Timber Creek Park and an interesting detail in regard to the name "Slim" which, according to the web site, the link for which I will add at the end of this paragraph, is the title for a livestock worker on a farm.  https://yummygal.wordpress.com/2012/09/11/timber-creek-park/

If, like me, you were a child, a girl child in particular, of the 1950's, you probably remember Sally Star.  She passed away in January and her funeral arrangements were held in Berlin, NJ.  Sally Starr had been inducted into the Broadcast Pioneers of Philadelphia Hall of Fame.  I saw Sally Star speak at a Paulsdale event a couple of years ago and I can attest that she was still sharp witted and beautiful in her late eighty's, though she seemed tired and she was forced to use a wheelchair to get around.  When I was growing up, you didn't see many women in the popular entertainment of the day, plenty of cowboys, but few cowgirls, you'd have thought taming the Wild West was an all male event.  There was, of course, Dale Evans, and these feisty women were an inspiration for me as a little girl. 

It seems as though New Jersey has a little bit of everything, but the cowboy history is an interesting mystery.  I'm afraid I haven't been to Cowtown yet, so I can't speak on that, but I know there were many horse farms and riding was a great recreation through the 1960's, according to my friends, many of whom remember learning how to ride horseback in their teens in that time.    I was unable to find any history on Slim's Ranch and if anyone out there knows anything, I'd be interested to hear about it.  wrightj45@yahoo.com.  Meanwhile, I'll contact some friends and see if I can find out more.  See you on the trails!  Jo Ann

5 comments:

  1. I was just looking to see if Slim's Ranch was still around and Google lead me to your post. I rode horses at Slim's Ranch on two separate occasions in the mid and late 90s. I wish I could direct you to some more information on the ranch. I remember it being a large oasis in the middle of a well developed area where they let you ride a horse all on your own. It was great. I'll never forget what one of the ranch hands told me when I had a somewhat stubborn horse. I had the horse aimed away from the stable (and food), but it was actually walking backwards. Well the ranch hand says to me "Who's riding who?" That's when I decided it was OK to dig my heels into the animal. And we had a great ride. Good memories. If I find anything else on Slim's I will post here.

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  2. There were two Slim's ranches. One in Chews Landing that I think is still there and the other in Sicklerville, which I worked at when I was 13. The horse that walked backward if she sensed unease in the saddle was a light grayish horse and I remember the top hand on the ranch saying exactly that to many a rider.

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  3. I boarded a horse at Slim's Ranch. Frank"Slim" Decicco owned it and ran it along with his wife Barb. They had a daughter Jeanie. Barb was as sweet as could be. Slim was ornery and a little mean...but then again, I was 13-17 at the time...LOL

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  4. I boarded a horse at Slim's Ranch. Frank"Slim" Decicco owned it and ran it along with his wife Barb. They had a daughter Jeanie. Barb was as sweet as could be. Slim was ornery and a little mean...but then again, I was 13-17 at the time...LOL

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  5. I visited there once and I never returned. My father, who used to break horses into getting used to riders years ago, and I went to Slim's, and we both had stubborn horses. My father also said that those horses looked tired. Later, a friend of mine said the same. What finally made me decide to never return was when my uncle, who boarded horses at his own farm and worked for a veterinarian, confirmed what my father said. He also reported this ranch to the Humane Society. I have since ridden at better horse ranches during that time in the 1960s and '70s.

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